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Tiny

This week, appreciate the tiny things in life.

Photo by Cheri Lucas Rowlands

During a fall visit to Wiesbaden, Germany, I strolled the streets of Altstadt — the Old Town — and came upon a miniature, three-dimensional map of the city center. I peered down at the sculpture, following tiny avenues, turning tiny corners, and studying the details of facades and roofs.

A sculptural map of Wiesbaden’s Old Town.

I located where I was staying — not far from Wiesbaden’s iconic Marktkirche, or Market Church — and traced various routes through the town, engrossed and giddy. I’ve always loved tiny versions of things: toys and collectibles, furry animals, even houses.

Browse the tiny worlds of Subatomic Tourism and Jennifer Nichole Wells for inspiration.

In this week’s challenge, show us tiny. Capture something at a smaller scale. Create your own miniature scene. Or experiment with the tilt-shift technique — Instagram and other apps have this built-in tool.

You can also interpret the theme in other ways by capturing your favorite tiny things — from your baby’s hands to belongings that are special to you — or documenting a small, quiet moment in your day. Have fun!

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  1. he air was pregnant with rain when we arrived at the Rio Blanco National Park in Belize. While walking on the wet grassy path, I noticed some green stuff moving around. On close inspection, I found that they were actually small pieces of leaves carried by leafcutter ants.

    These ants can be found in South and Central America, Mexico, and parts of the United States. They collect leaves to create fungus gardens underground to feed the whole colony.

    http://wp.me/p6FwZ-2zN

    Liked by 1 person

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