Menu

Chaos

This week, let’s embrace disorder and its creative power.

One recent afternoon I found myself inside a large cavernous space filled with thousands of excited kids and millions of LEGO bricks. No, I wasn’t having a nightmare during a nap. I’m a parent; I don’t expect to take a nap until 2019 at the earliest. I was at a LEGO expo.

Here are some of the epiphanies I had during that afternoon:

  • Stepping on a single piece of LEGO: horribly painful. Stepping on a gazillion LEGO blocks: surprisingly pleasant. (How come an enterprising podiatrist hasn’t come up with Legotherapy yet?)
  • Structures, statues, and mini-universes might be impressive and fun. But nothing was more satisfying — on several sensory levels — than the brick pit.

If you’ve never seen a brick pit, imagine a huge, unwalled ball pit… full of LEGO. Or just look at the photo I took of its endless, chaotic depths:

lego1

Just like with building blocks of all types, we’re often under the impression that photography needs to be orderly and neat, and serve some overarching design or idea. What I loved about the brick pit — and my photo of it — is that it embraced the creative potential of disorderly randomness: one huge heap of colorful, pixel-like atoms.

This week, share your own take on chaos, whether it’s the mess in your living room, a busy street crossing, a party on the verge of getting a little out of hand, or any other subject that celebrates a lack of (visual) control.

Show Comments

142 Comments

Close Comments

Join the conversation!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Comments

    1. We’re currently experiencing a pingback issue that requires us to manually approve them — so all pingbacks will show up (yours already does!), but after some delay; we’ll do our best to approve these as fast as we can.

      Like

    1. We’re currently experiencing a pingback issue that requires us to manually approve them — so all pingbacks will show up (yours already does!), but after some delay; we’ll do our best to approve these as fast as we can.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Normally, our software automatically detects spam and lets the “good” pingbacks in without approval. But something has set it off to block almost all pingbacks, which is why we need to go through the manual process. Our technical team is aware of the issue and will look into it.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. We’re currently experiencing a pingback issue that requires us to manually approve them — so all pingbacks will show up (yours already does!), but after some delay; we’ll do our best to approve these as fast as we can.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. As a mother more than half of my time is spent discovering and putting away wayward lego pieces. At any given time you can find them in my purse, in the car and various other locations of my life. This picture causes me severe anxiety. Perhaps next time, a trigger warning? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We’re currently experiencing a pingback issue that requires us to manually approve them — so all pingbacks will show up (yours already does!), but after some delay; we’ll do our best to approve these as fast as we can.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. We’re currently experiencing a pingback issue that requires us to manually approve them — so all pingbacks will show up (yours already does!), but after some delay; we’ll do our best to approve these as fast as we can.

      Like

500 Responses While this challenge is closed to new entries, we encourage you to visit the Reader to find other avid bloggers.