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Last Call! Commenting Bootcamp Starts Monday

Uncomfortable with commenting? Our one-week course builds your commenting confidence.

Registration for Commenting Bootcamp is now closed.

Clicking the “Publish” button on a new post makes many of us nervous — me included! — but clicking “Post Comment” can be even harder. Putting yourself out there on your own blog is one thing; putting yourself out there in someone else’s space is another entirely. Enter: Commenting Bootcamp!

This course was fun and packed a punch! Thank you for helping us get out there and comment. The assignments really make me think more critically about what I’m reading and how it moves me.
– Elizabeth at Rinconez

Commenting Bootcamp: March 21-25, 2016

This one-week challenge will build your confidence and push the boundaries of your commenting comfort zone, so you can build the connections with other bloggers that ultimately make blogging so rewarding. You’ll get a new commenting-related task each day, along with ideas for crafting great comments, commenting etiquette guidelines, and technical tips — and if you’re unsure about what you want to say, your fellow campers will be there to help. Learn more.

 

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  1. I’m very confused by something like this being offered… Isn’t the point of blogging just as was stated above- putting yourself out there, sharing with the world. I must be missing something because it seems like comments should be genuine and a reflection of who you are. Why does someone need a course to learn how to share their thoughts with someone who just put their own out there for the entire world to see. This just feels like it helps people overthink and not remain genuine, but I guess I shouldn’t judge before I know the content presented… This is very perplexing to me though because I began appreciating the “blogosphere”on the basis of it feeling so genuine.

    Liked by 8 people

    1. I think that some people might find it hard to articulate exactly what they enjoy about someones post. Also, a lot of people are worried about offending others by disagreeing with an opinion. So maybe this course will help with that. 🙂

      Liked by 9 people

      1. I guess it’s just hard for me to relate even if that is the case. I’m not an extrovert by any means but I value genuineness and one reason is because I think it’s lacking in so many people in our world. I resisted blogging for so long because I thought that bloggers were mostly like so many people on Facebook that present their lives on media falsely to project a completly different image than reality. I see that this is a creative space and I know people are trying to attract others to their blogs, but it seemed like people on here were so genuine. With courses like these, it does make me wonder if a lot of people are just marketing themselves rather than engaging vulnerably, genuinely, in a space that exists for genuine expression.

        Liked by 5 people

      2. I do think that we are being *encouraged* all over social media to value likes and followers and in turn see that as a reflection of how we are perceived. I know for a fact that many views/likes/followers of my own little blog are simply clicks and don’t mean much, because there is no further interaction. It doesn’t bother me so much because I will carry on doing my thing regardless. However I am VERY appreciative when someone takes the time to comment, because that’s a genuine commitment from them, timewise. I really love WordPress as a blogging platform, because my experiences so far have been with genuine people, who have something to say. Its not like Facebook, or Instagram or any of that ilk…..also there is no drama (touch wood!) 🙂

        Liked by 6 people

      3. I agree with you but I’m in for these programs because they offer you chance to meet new people. Which otherwise wouldn’t have been possible. Also I steer clear of awards or paid blog posts. I’m in for blogging for it’s true joy!

        Liked by 3 people

      4. There’s usually some good we can take out of everything! I’m sure the programs aren’t hurting anyone, I’m just perplexed that something like this exists, but that’s just me!

        Liked by 3 people

      5. You are not wrong. A good.. large percentage do comment without actually meaning it, which is certainly not good for anyone. I generally refrain from pressing follow button unless I like it and same goes for commenting! 🙂

        Liked by 4 people

      6. And without knowing it, and just speculating, I feel like a course like this help you “self market” rather than engage because of genuine interest… that’s just me though. I really do hope it helps people. Just because it’s not for me doesn’t mean it can’t help thousands.

        Liked by 3 people

      7. See the problem with that is the vulnerability part. In essence, unless you are attempting to use your brand as a way to promote your career as say–a writer–then it would do good to understand…(do good?) It would be great to know how to keep your thoughts in track with acting as a representation for your brand.

        The other aspect of this would be those who write because they want to and have no need to monetize their skills. For those people then… for those people vulnerability and intimacy in their writing as far as comments on other blogs is concerned…that would be a great course.

        Part of the reason most people don’t use their real names or might be hesitant is because they want that ability to speak freely without wondering if they are hurting their self image.

        Twitter is a great example. Those with real names have only that one real name and they must show a public side of them that is agreeable to the world around. If they let everyone know exactly what was on their mind at any given moment I doubt they would be so valued for their opinions.

        Kind of like journalism. You know?

        https://sigmamediafrlnc.wordpress.com/2016/03/15/journalistic-irony/

        Great example.

        Liked by 2 people

      8. I am in this specifically to engage vulnerably. I tend to make blogging buddies, and comment reciprocally on each others’ posts for a period of years: not just “Nice post!” but responding with feeling and thought. I will do the course to make new blogging buddies.

        I also think it perfectly OK to disagree pungently: where people blog homophobic or other bile, I tell them how foolish and deluded they are. I accept hostile comments: readers may judge for themselves.

        Liked by 2 people

      9. That’s awesome people make so many bloggers friends from this. It seems to be the reason most everyone is doing it. And it’s great that it helps people! It’s pretty relieving to hear that people have taken this course and do strive to be genuine. As I mentioned in basically every comment on this chain, my main concern is people not being genuine and that’s why I’m perplexed about a “commenting bootcamp.” Ironically, I think that a few things need to be reworded in the post because what people are saying they took out of it is not really what the post is coming across as (at least to me). If it’s more about making friends, learning tenchiques, and connecting with other bloggers while challenging eachother then I’m not sure why it’s called commenting bootcamp and presented as a way to learn how to comment. In my book there’s only a few ways to comment- respectively and genuinely or to not comment at all… again, that’s just me and I’m not saying, nor have I at any point said people shouldn’t take the course. All ice said is I was perplexed by it because I worry people aren’t being genuine by “learning” to comment.

        Liked by 2 people

      10. If you came to my blog and told me how foolish and deluded I was, I would verbally chase you out of town. My blog, my opinions. Feel free to disagree with me by all means, and articulate that in reasoned debate, but don’t just slam someone down because they wrote something you don’t like. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

    2. In our experience, many folks are quite nervous about leaving comments on other people’s blogs, or unsure about the etiquette around commenting — this course exists to give folks who might be holding back a little nudge, and to help them feel confident about sharing their thoughts (as well as to teach some technical bits, like creating bold text or hyperlinks in comments).

      Liked by 3 people

      1. The tech side sounds cool, if something like that was a bit more advertised, I could understand the draw to it. I didn’t realize there was an etiquette to follow on a blogging site that is here for genuine self expression. As far as that goes, since that is so much of a joy to me with the blogging culture, part of me almost wants to stay naive to the etiquette- and I am not one to ever choose to be or want to be ignorant. I like blogging because it makes me feel free, I really don’t want to be chanined down by an etiquette I did not know existed. If people are nervous to comment, I really do hope this helps them and I am sure, as I mentioned on a previous comment, that it is doing some good (as good can be taken out of almost anything) but I am just a little saddened at the thought that there is a possibility of people not being genuine by following some sort of formula given to them by a course. As I also mentioned before though, I do not know the content presented just the idea that was shared in the post and that is where I am drawing my reactions from.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. To be clear, we don’t give anyone a formula, and would never ask anyone to leave a comment on something they didn’t genuinely find thought-provoking or say something that wasn’t from the heart just for the sake of commenting. Bootcamp is a way to provide a some motivation, advice, and community support for those who’d like it or are feeling unsure; nothing more!

        Liked by 4 people

      3. I’m intrigued that some people would be uncomfortable to even comment on something they liked…especially when commenter is already a public blogger!

        However that said, some people really cover up their identity because the subject focus of their own blog is not something that they wish for family and friends to know. I actually am sad to think that is the situation with some bloggers who won’t disclose to closest friends, because that means it signals they can’t trust any close person to know this “blogging” identity of them.

        If it’s not dangerous /hurtful behavior the blogger is undertaking, there should be nothing to hide from at least your best/trusted friend on what one blogs publicly.

        Liked by 2 people

    3. I think blogging is something that can be geared to everyone’s introverted side. And in that sense, putting themselves out there would pretty hard. In a way I see this course as a way to broaden communication within the blogosphere, but that’s just my take.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. That’s great! It seems like that’s what a lot of people are using it for. Since that seems to be a major interest for a lot of bloggers, maybe they should open up more avenues for bloggers with common interests to connect. The community pools are pretty cool but it seems like most people are looking for other ways to network and those seem to be more geared to people requesting feedback.

        Liked by 3 people

      2. I’m using the comments to raise awareness for myself. Normally I would stick to myself and just hope people spotted my posts, but it just wasn’t happening so I turned to this format and suddenly people started seeing my stuff!

        Liked by 2 people

    4. I totally subscribe to your school of thought.
      We should I be trained on how to give my comments? I thought comments should be genuine, heartfelt & transparent.
      We don’t have to be like clones on this.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It seems that a lot of people are using this as a tool to connect with other bloggers. I mentioned previously that it seems like it would be a good idea for them to create other ways for bloggers with common interests to connect since that really seems to be what bloggers are trying to do with these courses. Like I said to others, if this is helping people, that’s great, but I personally didn’t get any clarity as to the purpose of the course. Especially with it being a week long, I think I noticed. But hey, again, if it is helping people, that’s great- it doesn’t have to be my cup of tea. Hopefully people remain genuine!

        Liked by 2 people

  2. I’m SO looking forward to this! I love commenting, and since starting proper blogging in January, I have made many friends, but am hoping that I can learn to encourage more people to comment back and get a real dialogue going. Its a lot more fun than just pressing the “like” button! 😀

    Liked by 5 people

  3. Exactly right. It’s an art form, sure there are times we could be sharper with grammar or spelling etc, but it’s still our stuff at the end of the day and what we wanted to put across

    Liked by 4 people

  4. I think it’s more about networking and not being rude then anything in particular. If you have a blog as somewhere to post things and thoughts, your fine but if you want people to really read your stuff you gotta start commenting 😊

    Liked by 5 people

  5. I’m excited to start learning a little bit more about blogging. Hoping to find a few I love and maybe gain a follower or two for mine.

    Liked by 5 people

  6. There is nothing wrong with soemone wanting to do a commenting blog course like this -to come across as genuine or learn how to come across as genuine. Most people in life are genuine but it doesn’t always translate in writing. We all have skills we can polish or add to our other skills tool box. I know who I am . I’m transparent and honest and I will do this week course to learn new skills. Knowledge is power. I’m a great believer in you never stop learning in life. Roll on the blogging commenting course.

    Liked by 6 people

  7. Why would we have to learn how to sound genuine? I would think most people would sit here… then say outloud what they want to comment, then type exactly that, complete and unabridged with slang, bad grammar, and using punctuation in a way… that… um… well, you know what I mean (Obviously).

    I suppose it isn’t a skill that one automatically knows though so perhaps it could help some people. You never know… we have marriage counseling… and people ought to know how to talk to each other… so go figure.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I think it’s less about being genuine and more about how not to flat out insult someone. To say “Oh you spelt that wrong” is a flat correction so I think it’s more about giving constructive criticism instead

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Ah I see, I thought not being an ass was common knowledge. Are we the only ones who know this???

        I learned something a long time ago. We only get one reputation. We have to behave in a way that preserves our character because it’s our character on which all our credibility hangs. I suppose this is why people seldom use their real name because of the freedom to truly express ourselves leaves no room for dishonesty and most times complete honesty leaves no room for omission–well meaning or not.

        I find having no opinion about many things is a trade off to retaining credibility in the potential to report trustworthy articles. This no opinion is translated to my twitter and wordpress most of the time. I may have a preference for coffee as opposed to soda but that won’t hinder my report on a supreme court decision as much as say my public expressions on the evils of democracy or some other volatile position.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I think there’s a difference between flat out insulting someone and giving commentary that helps someone Sharpen their abilities.

        I get what you mean, but there’s a difference between censorship and general meanness you know?
        Maybe I’m missing the point?

        Liked by 2 people

      3. No you’re right, there’s a difference. I and you probably see it the same way. Do unto others… But for some they have lower thresholds for what constitutes mean and honest. I’ve known some people that swear by brutal honesty but that to me just shows lack of consideration and no class.

        Perhaps this course would help some.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Well this post alone has certainly generated a lot of comments, so no doubt many will take the course. For me, I comment regularly on the blogs that I enjoy and I’m genuine with what I like and what I say. And I hope that others who visit my blog are as well. 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I wouldn’t say that. Imagine you had no other outlets for your creativity? Where could you go? It’s good to take criticism even if you need help in getting the will to take what people have to say over

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Thank you for accepting me in the commenting boot camp, I had participated in the past in 101, and 202 writing, with some comments that I exchanged with the fellows bloggers, I ventured to post, I had a little experience then, I was encouraged to reply to the follower, and people who like me on WPress, so I got some near 200 likes, a 100 of followers off my blogs, modestly speaking, it’s since 5 years from the first a blog , at snail speed, roundly 2000 hits, i do the math, and voila! Here I am just on time before the closing doors of boot camp, otherwise I would be posting under a tree
    Thank you

    Liked by 8 people

  10. Commenting demands respect, kindness and creativity upon my part. I don’t comment in the evil, negative, hurtful tones, because I choose to avoid evil, negative, hurtful blogs, books, and writings.

    -It’s ok to be selective, and if I cannot post a comment to hopefully bring possative ‘insightful thought or many; a giggle, smile or many laughs on a positive level, than I need to exit that post; blog without posting a comment.

    Liked by 9 people