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How do you change your habits?

Topic #255:

How do you change your habits?

For background, read this post by Ida from Ramblings of a Young Writer, who wrote:

While it is true that everyone is capable of changing (for better or worse), I don’t know that I am in a position to want to find out. So how do you fight the urge to fall into who you used to be?

We all talk about growing, and changing certain habits we have, from eating smarter, to being nicer to people we care about, to simply being more disciplined about tasks we want to do more, like writing.

How do you, when you’re trying to improve yourself, prevent the natural desire to fall back into old habits and patterns?

Read her full post as she talks mostly about writing, a habit we all think about.

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  1. Once it no longer serves its purpose, or it bores me to death keeping me in the same boring rut, when I am done with being masochistic, then I’ll just drop it. Fighting is futile, just like new year’s resolutions. If I repeat and repeat it again despite my attempts, then I will take a good look each time to see what deeper factors remain to keep me so willingly changed. When I uncover them satisfactorily, then I can drop them. Sometimes it is about one aspect at a time.

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    1. Once we recognize that we are not the thoughts we think, we learn to choose the “right” thought for the “right” situation with increasing frequency.

      And we start getting better results.

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  2. As far as I can think, it’s an inner urge that makes me try to find what will satisfy me more. I sometimes use some habits for a while, to feel safe until I decide what I need to change and how. Generally, I find that change is vital and the rule is to become a better person.

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  3. For me, change is not something that I can say that I am going to do and then do it. For me to change it has to be a real honest desire to change and then with God’s help I can make the change, without that, not so good.

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  4. After you see what’s going on sometimes it’s easy to just drop it, in another cases uncovering the desire that lies beneath and fulfill that in a different way does the trick, keeping in mind the motivation to change.

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  5. I got into the horrible habbit of thinking very negatively, especially about my relationship eventhough there was no real reason for it. What I did was make a fysical contract with myself and signing it. I took a big piece of drawing paper and designed every letter and made it look good, I wanted to take time and make a big effort out of the whole thing, thus ensuring I cared about the contract.
    I listed what I wanted, things like “taking time for me” , “drawing and painting more” “treating myself on nice things at least once a month” and “to wear make up and sexy lingery again”
    This contract really helped and was mostly to get me to feel good and possitive again.
    It worked!

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