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Eliminate and get rid of all extra redundancies

An added bonus of blogging on WordPress.com at the present time is that occasionally your blog will come under close…

An added bonus of blogging on WordPress.com at the present time is that occasionally your blog will come under close scrutiny by an Automattic staff member, who may choose to reblog one of your posts at a time when he’s in a rush and short on ideas of his own. He might not even collaborate together with you, choosing instead just to provide sort of an examplum of the point you make in the blog post in question. Of course, one of the basic fundamentals he would need to keep in mind is that when using another blog’s content as a source, it’s polite to refer back to the originating blog.

How many redundancies did you find in that paragraph? Count them and then compare the ones you found to the neat lists Lisa J. Jackson, who writes for the scrutinized blog in question, has written about here and here. Did you find them all? Can you come up with others?

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  1. The redundancies seem all too obvious in someone else’s text, but they are very talented to infiltrate my own (redundant?) writings without me even noticing.
    The only solution I can think of is to re-read my drafts many times: once for the grammar, then the logics, followed by the spell and finally the redundancies. I am just human and unable to produce a jewel-like text in a first attempt.

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    1. Me too – that’s the good part about writing as compared to speaking. Now, if I could only edit some of the things that come out of my mouth before they’re ‘published’…

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  2. Good article . . . I would think this about sums it up . . .
    Please, when using another blogger’s content as a source, be polite and refer back to the originating blog.

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  3. There is corruption because we live in a world of good and evil. You choose your path and sometimes the corrupt ruin your life just like Wall Street and Bankers. Think about it when life is good the bankers give themselves big bonuses, from the money we gave them, the people who live from pay cheque to pay cheque. It will always be like that, evil on earth will always win you have to choose whether you want to live a good or corrupt life. I believe in God, and I don’t want to lie on my death bed worried about all the wicked things I have done to other people. Then again how stupid can you be when you steal , have you no conscience, or faith that this life too will end.

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  4. This is intertwined with the problem of people thinking more words – and longer words – make for a smarter-sounding writing. I wouldn’t be surprised if minimum word counts for university papers contributed to this habit for so many people.

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    1. There are many generations who blog. I was brought up when ‘nice ‘ was not a word and was promptly told off. Another person asked me what English do I speak ,and all that came to mind was Oxford English.

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  5. 10 redundancies found, shown in { }
    “An added bonus {of blogging} on WordPress.com {at the present time} is that occasionally your blog will come under {close} scrutiny by an Automattic staff member, who may choose to reblog one of your posts {at a time} when s/he’s in a rush and short on ideas {of his own}. S/He might not even collaborate {together} with you, choosing instead {just} to provide {sort of} an examplum of the point you make in the blog post {in question}. Of course, one of the basic fundamentals {he would need to keep in mind} is that when using another blog’s content as a source, it’s polite to refer back to the originating blog.”

    Maybe that’s why it takes so long to do a blog post, I do re-read and correct – that and the slow browser I’m using – grrrrr.

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    1. how interesting. I used to have a journalist friend who used to invite me for lunch to chat. Little did I know she like to use my ideas in her next magazine article as one of her ideas. She is no longer called a friend.

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    2. Thanks Alisonamazed, I get now what the post was talking about. I didn’t know that he meant. I now know what redundancies are. In my day in English class we used to call these ‘Fillers'; unnecessary lines and words put in to fill the essay/article out for a higher word count when it really isn’t needed.

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    1. The redundancies in Canada because they would not cut their wages from $35.00 to $16.95 was just a ploy to get rid of them all and move to the USA. Catapiller made money a lot this year, it will always be like this, money talks. People are just the fodder for the capitalist.

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  6. No, no! It’s ok–in fact, it’s downright artistic–to be a little bit redundant as long as (and this is important) you know how to set the redundancies apart using punctuation. Punctuation loves you and wants you to be happy. Don’t put its love upon no shelf!

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